Book Review: Revolution by Jessica Frances

Revolution

Author: Jessica Frances
Publisher: Jessica Frances
Published: January 26th, 2016
Pages: 334
Audience: YA
Genre: Science Fiction, Dystopian

Source: I received a copy of this book from Xpresso Book Tours in exchange for an honest review.


Blurb:

I was raised in a world where humans no longer rule. 
In the past, we made a terrible mistake by creating a new species we thought would serve us as our army, which led to our downfall. 
There was a war, we lost, and many lives were massacred. It was the end of life as we knew it and the beginning of a hell we were now trapped in. We became enslaved to what we now called Superiors, becoming pets to them, simply there to entertain. 
In a world so miserable, I managed to do the unthinkable: I fell in love. But even that was doomed, because to love a Superior was forbidden.
What the rest of the Superiors didn’t know was how deeply a human could love or how resilient we became when we were hurt.
The Superiors never could have imagined an uprising, which was why they never saw it coming.
Humans deserved to be free, and I would stop at nothing to deliver that promise.
My name is Tilly, and I am still alive with one sole purpose: to begin a revolution.

~

I had been raised to believe humans were worthless. We owned them and controlled them, and when we were done with them, we threw them away. Therefore, I never thought I would ever feel more for Tilly than disinterest. I never expected to want to save her.
It was forbidden for a Superior to love a human. No one had ever crossed that line, but I did. I fell madly in love with her, so it was no surprise how we ended up.
I was raised to be a soldier, and that was what I was always going to be. However, I was not a soldier for the Superiors, not anymore.
I became a soldier for humans, and I would stop at nothing to help them. They deserved to be free, and I would die protecting them.
My name is Johnny, and I am here with one sole purpose: to finish a revolution.


My Review:

In Revolution, we find ourselves in a world where human technology progresses to the point of its own destruction by creating an advanced race of human. These Superiors enslaved humanity – treating them like animals and sometimes less than that. Hope is found when a human girl and a Superior boy fall in love.

I wanted to like this book. Really I did, but it didn’t catch me. Honestly, I almost gave up around 3%, but I decided to push through it. What hung me up the most (other than me not connecting the Tilly) was that there was a lot of repetition – the same thoughts mentioned within the same chapter and throughout the book. It was distracting. I also wasn’t a fan of the writing style it was at times to formal and other’s it just didn’t flow – but that is my issue. Although it started out slow, the story did progress and became interesting enough to capture my attention until the end.

“I have never been much of a crier, used to the abuse and bleak life I have often have to face. However, since I have been down here, my tears have been endless, and suddenly, everything feels like it is too hard.” – Revolution, Jessica Rowse

My favorite aspect of Revolution was the narrative. It is split between the two main characters Tilly and Johnny, but the catch is that you find out rather quickly that Johnny is dead. Johnny’s narrative starts in the past and Tilly’s is present day. The two narratives are woven together well and despite knowing about Johnny’s fate, it didn’t negate from the tension.

Tilly wasn’t a character I clicked with. Did I sympathize with her? Hell yes. Did I root for her? Yes. Did I like her? Not really. I can’t tell you why I didn’t click with her, I just didn’t. She seemed a little too well-rounded for a girl who spent most of her life a slave. Yes, she had Charlotte and Johnny – but the abuse she endured was something I feel would have left her with more pronounced emotional scars.

Johnny’s story was endearing and I loved every single one of his chapters. Watching him struggle with what he was told and what he sees with his own eyes that leads him down the path of loving Tilly was heartwarming.

“I hope my eyes are no longer the blue Tilly mentioned liking earlier. My default appearance was something she liked, and I don’t want to steal that comfort away from her. For some reason, I can’t bear the thought of hurting her while I looked like that.” – Revolution, Jessica Rowse

His past chapters detailing the abuse his father gave not only to Tilly, but to him and his sister were offset by Charlotte – his human-loving, caring sister. Over his chapters, Johnny struggles with discovering his emotions – something that is obvious to us the readers, but not in an annoying way.

I really enjoyed the moral implications of Revolution. How it exaggerates racism to its extremes, exploring what life would be like if the entire human race was subjected to super beings who hated them. This moral that makes the core of Revolution is important – even in its exaggeration – it is something that I feel needs to be written about more.